Declaration of Liquid Culture

Code is poetry. Our works of art are called Twitter, Instagram, Youtube or Github. There, everybody is free to make their works public. Each work will be retrieved by those searching for it. Our artists are the developers creating these open spaces, our studios are the co working spaces and hacker spaces, our art dealers and collectors are the venture capitalists financing the work of the creatives and making them big when successful.

Who can still say: “Behold, this is my work”? The times are over where tools and education defined who would be an artist and who would not. High culture is as dead as the Latin of the 13th century. It is still spoken, yet it has lost its relevance. In its lieu the vernacular flourishes. These vernaculars define the culture. Wonderful works will be created from the present-at-hand. Originality means finding the right remix.

The role of the creatives as creators of their work clears away. In Liquid Authorship a work is never completed – the work is in movement, it is nourished by all who create, quote, distribute and advance it. The flowing work has no beginning and no end, it lives on. It is socially added value. Culture is no commodity, but a process.

Culture is our cult. Our cult’s symbols are not religious. They are icons we share to unite with each other. The hash-tag for us is the pentagram of the alchemists and cat images is the fish of the early Christians in the catacombs. But who has the right to deny us access to our culture? Who has the right to tell us how we would have to exchange our symbols? It is our cult. We alone have all rights reserved.

via Memetic Turn.

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