syndax vuzz

exploration – experimentation – examination

syndax vuzz

AGI Ruin: A List of Lethalities

This situation you see when you look around you is not what a surviving world looks like.  The worlds of humanity that survive have plans.  They are not leaving to one tired guy with health problems the entire responsibility of pointing out real and lethal problems proactively.  Key people are taking internal and real responsibility for finding flaws in their own plans, instead of considering it their job to propose solutions and somebody else’s job to prove those solutions wrong.  That world started trying to solve their important lethal problems earlier than this.  Half the people going into string theory shifted into AI alignment instead and made real progress there.  When people suggest a planetarily-lethal problem that might materialize later – there’s a lot of people suggesting those, in the worlds destined to live, and they don’t have a special status in the field, it’s just what normal geniuses there do – they’re met with either solution plans or a reason why that shouldn’t happen, not an uncomfortable shrug and ‘How can you be sure that will happen’ / ‘There’s no way you could be sure of that now, we’ll have to wait on experimental evidence.’

A lot of those better worlds will die anyways.  It’s a genuinely difficult problem, to solve something like that on your first try.  But they’ll die with more dignity than this.

AGI Ruin: A List of Lethalities – LessWrong

On the Wildness of Children — Carol Black

We are engaged in a vast dystopian project of one-upping our creator, of treating the Kosmos as though it were a fixer-upper, and of imagining we can redesign ourselves as well as the world we are to live in.   The social engineers who shaped our world understood very well that no matter how far civilization “progresses,” each new human being is born wild –– in other words, human –– and they made it their overt goal to create an institution that would break the will, the “self-will” the “self-determination”–– that would subdue the wildness –– of our children.   It works.  But like any other radical intervention in the natural world, like dams, like pesticides, like genetically modified crops, the mass institutionalization of children alters our lives and our planet in ways that are both unanticipated and beyond our control.

Species die, our planet warms, and in the name of teaching our children to save the world, we go on destroying their wildness, “socializing” them away from nature and into the cage we have built around childhood.  Our nice teachers try to find ways to make it “fun,” to limit or at least soften the damage that is done; like zookeepers giving beach balls to captive polar bears, they try to find substitutes for what is lost.   But the world is too beautiful to substitute for, and the wildest of our children––the ones they have to put on Ritalin, the ones they have to put on Prozac–– know it.  These children are the canaries in the coal mine, the ones who will not obey our masters, who will not take their place as cogs in the machine that is destroying the earth.  They are not the ones who have a “disorder.”  They are the ones who still hold the perfect Kosmos in their hearts.

The revolution will not take place in a classroom.

In wildness is the preservation of the world. 

On the Wildness of Children — Carol Black

The Coming Tsunami of Grief

Kevin Hester

As runaway abrupt climate change and it’s brutal reality bares down on us with the speed of a tsunami, another little discussed side affect is grief. I shall try to cover it in this blog and provide some avenues for readers to seek solace and solidarity below.
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Those of us who are monitoring the unraveling of the biosphere will be fully aware of this aching phenomenon already but our numbers are relatively few (sic) due to the lies and obfuscating taking place regarding the severity of the crisis, yet when the awareness of the imminent demise of our species dawns on the afflicted planets populace, all the symptoms of grief will manifest on a monumental scale!

Sadness, depression, anger, denial, resignation, pick your poison (sic), try and be gentle with yourself and those you interact with. Embrace your grief, acknowledge it, share it with those you trust. Support those of…

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The Great Zero Gate

Quote

There is no stability in the world; it is like a house on fire. This is not a place where you can stay for a long time. The murderous demon of impermanence is instantaneous, and it does not choose between the upper and lower classes, or between the old and the young.If you want to be no different from the buddhas and Zen masters, just don’t seek externally.

The pure light in a moment of awareness in your mind is the Buddha’s essence within you. The nondiscriminating light in a moment of awareness in your mind is the Buddha’s wisdom within you. The undifferentiated light in a moment of awareness in your mind is the Buddha’s manifestation within you.

– Thomas Cleary, Zen Essence

The Great Zero Gate

Why “we” ignore the IPCC, and what to do about it.

Marc Hudson

This is a (light) expansion of this Twitter thread, about an article on the Guardian website by one of their environment reporters, Fiona Harvey. Ms Harvey is anticipating (plausibly – tomorrow we shall see if she is right) that the latest Working Group 3 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will sink without trace in the media.

What troubles me is that there is no historical awareness of this pattern. That’s understandable (if still irritating) in a news report – journalists have limited time, limited word count. What is more irritating, though still understandable – I guess – is the historical amnesia/ignorance of the climate “movement” (take the scare quotes as given if I use the word movement again in this rant).

So, will tackle the following

  • The existence of a “Groundhog Day” component to this
  • The reasons behind it – topic-based, individual, media structure, social movement…

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Humanity: sailing into a stagnant ocean

Surviving C21

“We were the first that ever burst into that silent sea.”– STColeridge, Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Like the mariners of old, humanity has embarked on a deadly voyage into a world unable to support life in its current abundance. A stagnant, dying world where poisons seep amain through ocean and atmosphere.

Life first appeared on Earth around 3.8 billion years ago, not long after the planet itself formed. But for the next 3 billion years it did very little. There was something about those dark, primordial oceans that prevented lifeforms such as we see today, and such as ourselves, from arising. Only bacteria and primitive algae could survive. Then, around 700 million years ago, life burst forth in all its magnificent variety, growing from the simple creatures we see in the Ediacaran rocks of Australia to fish, plants and land-dwelling animals by around 300 million years ago.

The…

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Our insurrection will be impure!

winter oak

by Paul Cudenec

A powerful and inspiring book calling for resistance to the Great Reset and its world is making waves in France.

What is perhaps surprising is that it has been published by Seuil, one of the big Parisian publishing houses.

What is less surprising is thatManifeste conspirationnistehas come under attack from all the usual pro-system sources, not least on theleft.

Although this anonymous workevidentlycomes from theInvisible Committee, of Tarnac fame, who are usually labelled “ultra-left”, these critics are seeking to smear it with the “far right” association which has today become sopredictableas to be laughable.

Imagining a new opposition to this system, which entirely transcends existing classifications, is apparently beyond the range of their mental powers – or in contradiction to their underlying political aims.

Manifeste conspirationnistepulls no punches in more than 300 pages of analysis and…

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We Need to Radically Reimagine Our Food System. Here’s How.

The Most Revolutionary Act

A global food system that is both truly sustainable and sufficiently productive will consist, not of a few massively scaled practices, but rather a vast patchwork quilt of smaller scale solutions that vary dramatically from place to place, over space and over time, in an interplay with local climate, ecology and culture.

Radically reimagining our food systems is a task that is critical to solving the world’s biggest social and ecological problems. It’s also one that garners substantial and often heated debate.

But are we asking the right questions when it comes to evaluating what works, and what doesn’t, for achieving more climate-friendly and food-secure futures?

Scholars and analysts are carefully exploring the potential of a wide range of solutions, from cellular agriculture to regenerative grazing, and asking whether they will scale — that is, whether they can be implemented widely around the globe.

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The Revolt of the Imagination, Part One: Notes on Belbury Syndrome

Imagination is thus one of the basic tools of human empathy. Under most circumstances, we don’t perceive the world through anyone else’s eyes and mind but our own.  There are ways around that limitation, but the most flexible and expansive of the lot is the imagination. When you were six and your mother told you, “How would you feel if he did that to you?”—if, in fact, she was so unfashionable as to do something so useful to your future mental health—she was trying to get you to use your imagination, to construct from your own memories a figuration of what you would have felt if you had been in the other child’s place. That use of the imagination becomes the basis for moral reflection, and ultimately for one kind of wisdom.

The Revolt of the Imagination, Part One: Notes on Belbury Syndrome | Ecosophia